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Articles and Publications
Alcohol Use Problems
An overview: Alcohol is of course a legal but controlled drug, similar to the situation with tobacco. Ironically, the misuse of this legal drug (as does the use of tobacco) has costs for individuals and society that far outreach the cost of illegal drugs. The World Health Organisation identifies alcohol (through intoxication, its toxicity, and alcohol dependence), as the third highest risk factor for disease throughout the world. In NZ, alcohol harm costs are estimated at between $1-4 billion each year.
Anxiety and Coexisting Addiction: a Common Alliance
Anxiety is a very common emotion. It can arise when we suddenly remember something we should have done but forgotten to do, and it’s due now! It can also occur as part of a very primitive survival process...
Behavioural Addictions and Suicide: an under-estimated relationship?
What is an ‘addiction’?; Internet Pornography Addiction; Pathological or compulsive gambling; Males affected by behavioural addictions with suicidal ideation.
Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT): a therapy for all seasons
Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is perhaps the most researched therapeutic approach over the last half Century...
The Forgotten Family
Addiction services have historically focussed upon providing help for those exhibiting problem gambling behaviour. However, often overlooked is that their family/whanau experience as much or more financial hardship, as the person who has the gambling problem.
The Gambling Act
Passed into law on the 18th September 2003.
Gambling and Violence
Reprinted from Problem Gambling: New Zealand perspectives on treatment.
Gambling and Depression
Identification and Intervention:Depression is a common occurrence associated with problem gambling – whether you are the person gambling or you are the family or whanau of someone with a gambling problem.
Gambling Problems and Attempted Suicide: Part One – High Prevalence Amongst Hospital Admissions
In this study 70 patients admitted to an Auckland (New Zealand) hospital following a suicide attempt were screened with a brief problem gambling screen (the Eight Screen) by hospital staff. Twelve (17.1%) were positives for problem gambling, with half having attempted suicide in the past. A conclusion was drawn that problem gambling amongst those who had attempted suicide could be an important factor in designing effective future interventions.
Gambling Problems and Attempted Suicide: Part Two – Alcohol Abuse Increases Suicide Risk
The coexistence of alcohol misuse and problem gambling is a common association, while alcohol misuse amongst those who attempt suicide is also high. This research involved 70 patients admitted to an Auckland (New Zealand) hospital immediately following a suicide attempt. The first paper in this study identified twelve (17.1%) of these patients as being positive on the Eight problem gambling screen. Of these, 75% were also positive on the CAGE alcohol screen, compared with 31% of these patients who were negative on the gambling screen. Problem gambling patients who had attempted suicide were also more likely to be Maori (indigenous New Zealanders). The severity of the suicide attempt between the patients screened as problem gambling and those who were not problem gambling did not differ.
Internet Pornography Addiction
Are prevention & therapy options?
Internet Addiction and the Employers Role
A case for a caring Code of Practice for Internet Usage.
Methamphetamine and Other Illegal Drugs: an Overview
Prevalence of use in New Zealand: Although most damage from drug use comes from the legal drugs alcohol and tobacco, it is often illegal drugs that capture the concern and fear of communities. Illegal drugs include methamphetamine in its pure form (“P” if NZ made; ‘ice’ or ‘crystal meth’ if imported), heroin and ‘homebake’ (NZ made opiate), GHB (“Fantasy”; induces memory loss), cocaine, and lesser strength amphetamine-like drugs such as MDMA (“Ecstasy”, which also is a hallucinogen), non-prescribed Ritalin and some party drugs (BZP) which were made illegal in April, 2008.
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and the Problem Gambler
Reprinted from Problem Gambling: New Zealand perspectives on treatment.
Coexisting Problems and Problem Gambling
The case for AOD and mental health workers to identify problem gambling behaviour and intervene.
Problem Gambling Treatment from a Coexisting Perspective
The perspective of pathological gambling as an addiction is a relatively accepted paradigm, despite it being categorised in DSM as an impulse disorder.
Problem Gamblers – Do GPs Want To Intervene?
Survey: GPs' attitudes towards problem gamblers and knowledge to successfully intervene.
Problem Gamblers – A Challenge For GPs
Pathological gambling is a progressive disorder that develops from occasional lapses in control of time or money spent, to a pathology that results in destructive behaviour that affects both the gambler and his or her family, and is generally accompanied by alcohol abuse, anxiety, mood and personality disorders.
Problem Gambling and its Relevance to the Banking Sector
In 2002, New Zealanders spent in excess of $1.7B in legitimate gambling, with a steady increase every year that is resistant to variance in the economy.
Problem Gambling and Suicide
The relationship between problem gambling, alcohol misuse and suicide in a population presenting following an episode of self-harm. A thesis submitted by Alison Penfold in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, 2004.
Smoking & Problem Gambling
A high health risk for both smokers and non-smokers.
Smoking and Problem Gambling in New Zealand
Problem gamblers' rates of smoking increase when they gamble. Those seeking help for gambling problems having a high prevalence of smoking and may increase their rate of smoking when gambling. This may raise awareness of the increased risk from some problem gamblers to all gamblers (and staff) for tobacco-related health problems and may support legislation that restricts smoking in gambling environments.Those seeking help for gambling problems having a high prevalence of smoking and may increase their rate of smoking when gambling. This may raise awareness of the increased risk from some problem gamblers to all gamblers (and staff) for tobacco-related health problems and may support legislation that restricts smoking in gambling environments.
Suicide, Alcohol and Gambling
Increasing the odds
Suicide and Problem Gambling: Evaluating Intervention Needs
Reprinted from Problem Gambling: New Zealand perspectives on treatment.
Te Whare o Tiki
Co-existing problems knowledge and skills framework. This framework has been adapted by Dr Fraser Todd and the joint mental health and addiction workforce development centres based on the work of Dr Tom Flewett and the Co-existing Disorders Team of Capital and Coast DHB, Community Alcohol and Drug Service.
Tobacco Smoking Factsheet
Although tobacco smoking is decreasing in New Zealand, 18% of adults smoke...
Trauma Counselling and Supervision
Responses to Trauma: In the event of any natural disaster or in fact, any happening outside the scope of our normal experience and coping abilities, it is natural to feel stressed, anxious and on edge, and have difficulty focusing and managing usual, everyday activities. In stressful times, especially when we don’t know what is going to happen next, and we also feel concerned for others in our care, our usual coping mechanisms become stretched.
Workplace Stress
Employers’ responsibilities & solutions.